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Prep Football: League play takes center stage in the Big 5, Little 4 this weekend

first_imgThe last time the Del Norte football team made its way to Fortuna, there was an undefeated regular season at stake for the hometown Huskies.The stakes may not be as high as last November, but there’s still plenty to play for.Both of the Big 5’s 1-0 teams clash in the Friendly City tonight, as Fortuna and Del Norte look to set the early pace in league play when the two teams meet at Husky Field tonight.Both Fortuna (2-3 overall, 1-0 Big 5) and Del Norte (3-2, 1-0) claimed wins over …last_img read more

Job Advice SA: online network uses Twitter to help job seekers

first_imgIf you’re looking for work, Job Advice SA is willing to guide you. All you have to do is contact them on social media for tips.The founders of Job Advise SA: Wesley Madziva, Vanessa Raath and Tim Barry. (Image: Job Advise SA Facebook)Melissa JavanThree individuals who wanted to connect recruiters and job seekers in an informal environment host a Twitter chat called #JobAdviceSA every Monday at 16:00 for an hour.The topics of this chat range from job hunting, to applying for jobs and going to interviews. The Job Advice SA team has also hosted chats on seasonal themes such as job seeker horror stories during October, the month in which Halloween falls.Vanessa Raath, Tim Barry and Wesley Madziva started Job Advice SA in June 2014, not having met in person. “We all chatted regularly via social media and realised that we shared a common goal – to help people find jobs,” Raath says.Other than Twitter, job seekers can also contact Job Advice SA on the Facebook page or Google+ account.See few Tweets from the chat on Monday, 20 February 2017:A personal tip that worked for me – if you’re looking for a job make it clear on your social media profiles! I used #HireTim #JobAdviceSA— Tim Barry (@TimJBarry) February 20, 2017Your public image. Your personal brand matters. It starts with how you treat people in real life. @greg_savage #JobAdviceSA pic.twitter.com/DkjIqGKx0s— Wesley Madziva (@WeszMadz) February 21, 2017Never speak negatively about why you left your previous job #JobAdviceSA— Mason3m_ (@menzimason) February 20, 2017The beginningInitially they launched their Twitter chat as #JobRecChatSA. After they met in person at a human resources conference in Johannesburg in May 2016, they decided to change the Twitter chat’s name.It relaunched to #JobAdviceSA because they realised that more job seekers engaged in their weekly chats. “We found that there was more interest from job seekers as opposed to recruiters,” explains Raath.“There were far more people looking for advice as opposed to recruiters looking to join in the chat and give advice. The focus shifted slightly to help people looking for jobs and not in connecting job seekers with recruiters as we had done previously.“This was a good move and I know we have added great value to many job seekers,” she says. “We give good advice but then people must find their own jobs, using what we have taught them.”How the Twitter chat worksRaath says they choose a suitable theme and four questions to answer during the course of the chat. “(We) write and publish a framing post incorporating the questions and expanding on the theme, then promote the chat leading up to 16:00 on Monday.“We ask a new question every 15 minutes, starting at 16:00. One of us acts as the main host tweeting the questions from @JobAdviceSA,” she explains. “We answer the questions as well others on the topic or even other topics posed by participants during the hour slot, more often than not going on well past 17:00.”Most Mondays, #JobAdviceSA becomes a trending topic on Twitter.We did it Again! Thanks @WeszMadz @Van_Raath @TimJBarry and The #JobAdviceSA Community Members pic.twitter.com/KYB5RR5rBW— JobAdviceSA (@JobAdviceSA) February 20, 2017The teamMadziva is a social media expert, consulting and speaking about the topic. His work experience also includes specialising in human resources (HR) and recruitment.Barry is a business development consultant. Barry’s work experience also includes speaking about employer branding, HR and recruitment technology, and social media marketing.Raath has had 10 years experience in the recruitment industry – both internal and external recruitment. She now specialises in information technology recruitment, mainly on the Microsoft platform.AdviceThe one thing you should never do is pay a recruiter to register with them, warns Raath. “You should not pay them if they find you a job.“The recruiter will have an agreement in place with the client (your new employer) who will pay them for securing you as the candidate’s services. Recruitment agencies who want to charge people for registering with them are scams.”Raath says that there are recruiters who look for work for people in specific industries or career paths. For example, she is a recruiter for seniors in the information technology industry. “If you are more senior it is best to find a recruiter who specialises in that industry – they will be more connected and will have a better variety of clients and opportunities.”According to Raath, it’s troubling that most job seekers do not put the required effort into the job hunt. “They must have an excellent, well presented curriculum vitae; make sure they prepare for their interviews and be constantly up-skilling themselves,” she says.“We also touch a lot on personal branding and how this is important to stand out from your peers. We give advice every week so people would need to join our chat to learn more – every week there are new things on how to improve (your brand).”Follow the #JobAdviceSA discussion:#JobAdviceSA Tweets Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Brand SA brings education dialogue to Soweto

first_imgBrand South Africa will bring an opportunity to discuss education with specialists in the field, to the community in Soweto when it hosts the second Play Your Part/Sowetan dialogue in Soweto, Orlando West, Uncle Toms Hall on 22 January.Education plays a significant role in growing a country and in its competitiveness, says Brand South Africa CEO Miller MatolaThe dialogue will focus on the topic, “Why many learners and students start but don’t finish?” and is in line with the awareness that learners must stay in school to receive quality education.The discussion will be guided by:Adam Habib – Vice Chancellor at Wits UniversityVuyo Jack – CEO and founder of EmpowerdexPanyaza Lesufi – National Department of Basic EducationRosie Chirongoma – (PfP) Fundraising and Stakeholder Engagement at SymphoniaDr Jeffrey Mabelebele – Higher Education South AfricaBrand South Africa CEO Miller Matola said, “Education plays a significant role in growing a country and in its competitiveness. We therefore need to ensure our school system can deliver quality education to enrich our learners and provide them with the tools they need to be successful.”“I invite all those interested in ensuring our education system is able to deliver the kind of education that supports the intellectual growth and development of our young people to play their part and attend the dialogue,”  concluded Mr Matola.Sowetan Dialogues are public conversations held in local communities across the country. They provide a platform for discussions on issues that affect societies and what we can collectively do to improve these conditions.Media are invited to attend as follows:Date       :        Wednesday, 22 January 2013Venue    :        Soweto, Orlando West, Uncle Toms HallTime       :       18h00 for 18:30RSVP     :        Fikile MakhobaEmail: [email protected]                       Mobile: 082 404 4856The entrance to the dialogue is free although places must be booked. To book please SMS keyword DIALOGUES, name and surname to 41936. SMSes are charged at R1.50/SMS. Free minutes do not apply. Booking line closes on 21st January 2014. Confirmation will be sent via SMS or RSVP to [email protected] of the panelistsProfessor Adam HabibProfessor Adam Habib is the Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of the Witwatersrand, and has served in this position as from the 1st of June 2013. He is an academic, an activist, an administrator, and a renowned political media commentator and columnist. A Professor of Political Science, Habib has more than 30 years of academic, research, institutional and administration expertise. His experience spans five universities and multiple local and international institutions, boards and task teams. His professional involvement in institutions has always been defined by three distinct engagements: the contest of ideas; their translation into actionable initiatives; and the building of institutions.Panyaza LesufiMr Panyaza Lesufi is a spokesman for the Department of Basic Education. He was born in Tembisa where he led a number of youth and student structures before getting arrested under the 1988 Apartheid Emergency Regulation for belonging to then banned organizations (ANC, MK and COSAS). Mr Lesufi matriculated at Vital Link Student Cooperation and went on to study Business Administration at the University of Natal in Durban where he was voted President of the SRC. He served in the Senate, Council and EXCO of the University and was awarded the Best SRC President ever by the University Natal as well as the Albert Luthuli Inter-Personal Relations Award. He served as Deputy Regional Secretary of the ANC at Ekurhuleni for 10 years before being elected to the Provincial Executive Committee (PEC) of the ANC Gauteng Province. Mr Lesufi also served as a board member of the Ellis Park Disaster Fund and Chairperson of the Matthew Goniwe School of Leadership.Rosie ChirongomaMs Rosie Chirongoma deals with Fundraising and Stakeholder Engagement at Symphonia. Ms Chirongoma’s interests include current affairs, creating awareness about the issues that affect African children and working with children in disadvantaged communities. Armed with a National Diploma in Architectural Technology, she lists strong leadership, good communication skills, being passionate and driven as well as willingness to take risks as her strengths. Ms Chirongoma has been actively involved in affecting change at a grassroots level in South Africa since 2007. Her list of community projects include: Big Brother Big Sister; the Paballo Ya Batho project which helps provide food, medical care and companionship to 500 destitute and homeless people living in the inner city of Johannesburg. In 2010, Ms Chirongoma spent her weekends looking after abandoned children at the TLC Children’s Home. She was recognised as a Nedbank Local Hero, in 2007, for providing 450 learners at New Generation School with learning resources and an environment conducive for learning in an informal settlement.Vuyo JackVuyo Jack grew up in Dube, Soweto where he entertained the idea of becoming a film director, before a family friend in merchant banking changed his mind. He then decided to study accounting which he sees as a critical basis for informed economic decision-making, and as a central measure of business performance. Since co-founding Empowerdex, Vuyo was appointed as a member of the dti’s BEE Task Team in 2003 and has advised both government departments and various corporates on matters of BEE. Vuyo has a weekly column in Sunday’s Business Report on issues surrounding BEE. In addition to his role as Executive Chairman of Empowerdex, Vuyo lectures Financial Accounting at Wits on a part-time basis.Dr Jeffrey MabelebeleDr Jeffrey Mabelebele joined Higher Education South Africa (HESA) in 2009 as a Director, Operations and Sector Support.  Prior to this, he worked for the Human Sciences Research Council as a Researcher, Government Communication and Information System as a Director in the Project Office and the National Treasury’s Technical Assistance Unit as Director, Knowledge Management. His research interests include social values, identity and memory. Dr Mabelebele studied at the universities of Limpopo and UNISA. His work is published widely in accredited and peer reviewed journals.last_img read more

Window Performance 4 — Dealing with Edge Losses

first_imgAlex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. Watch for a forthcoming BuildingGreen special report on windows. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. The problem with aluminum is that it’s highly conductive, readily transferring heat from the warm inner pane of glass to the cold outer pane. Because of this heat loss, the inner pane of glass often cools off enough that water vapor from the indoor air condenses on it — and you get droplets of water forming on the inside of the window. If you have wood windows, that condensate often wets the wood, causing staining or even rot.We indicate risk of condensation forming on a window using a standardized measure from the National Fenestration Rating Council, “Condensation Resistance.” This is expressed as a number between 1 and 100, with higher numbers indicating greater resistance to condensation.So, what to do about it? Manufacturers have worked hard over the past several decades to deal with the problem. Here are the primary options:Stainless steelStainless steel is just 1/15th as conductive as aluminum. Furthermore, stainless steel is a lot stronger, so glazing spacers made out of stainless steel can have thinner walls. Conductivity is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the material through which heat is flowing, so stainless steel glazing spacers are better for two reasons: lower conductivity and thinner walls. Indeed, stainless steel is rapidly displacing aluminum as the leading glazing spacer material.Butyl rubberButyl rubber is a great sealant because it sticks really well to glass and other materials, and it’s also a good insulator. Rubber is 120 times less conductive than stainless steel and 1900 times less conductive than aluminum. To work as a glazing spacer, a thin reinforcing metal strip is often used to maintain the proper thickness. The strip of metal increases the conductivity (though the metal never contacts the glass); the spacer’s conductivity remains a lot lower than an all-metal spacer. A desiccant is incorporated into the butyl rubber.Swiggle Seal, the first so-called “warm-edge spacer,” was introduced in 1979. The name refers to the thin ribbon of metal reinforcement that is in a wavy shape. While the edge of an IGU with low-e2 and a standard aluminum spacer has a condensation resistance of 19.3, according to testing done by Enermodal Engineering, with butyl rubber and a metal strip that condensation resistance improves to about 38. Swiggle Seal is manufactured by TruSeal, which is now owned by Quanex Building Products Corporation. While still found in some products, the success of stainless steel spacers has dampened the market for butyl rubber spacers in recent years.Silicone foamThe least conductive glazing spacers are made of silicone foam. These inorganic foams don’t soften as much as butyl rubber and lose their shape, so they don’t require strips of metal reinforcement. Like the butyl rubber spacers, a desiccant is formulated into the silicone foam.The dominant product on the market employing this technology is the Super Spacer, made by Edgetech in Cambridge, Ohio (which is now also owned by Quanex. Super Spacer is made of silicone foam with no metal reinforcement. Several additional layers are added to make the foam impervious to vapor — both to keep water vapor from getting in and to keep any low-conductivity gas fill, such as argon, from escaping. The condensation resistance of the above-described IGU with this glazing spacer is 44.9.Bottom lineAlong with minimizing the risk of condensation at the edges of windows, warm-edge spacers will improve the overall unit U-factor of a typical residential, double-glazed window by about U-0.02 Btu/hr·ft2·°F. For example, if the unit U-factor with standard aluminum spacers would be 0.30, the warm-edge spacers would reduce that to 0.28. That improvement (reduction in heat flow) might sound modest, but it adds up! Over the last three weeks I’ve focused on the major strategies for improving the energy performance of windows: adding extra layers of glass, increasing the thickness of the airspace between the layers of glass, adding low-emissivity coatings, and replacing air with a low-conductivity gas fill. These strategies all help to reduce heat flow through an insulating glass unit (IGU), and if we do a really good job with these strategies we can achieve center-of-glass R-values of R-5 or higher.But these measures don’t do much to improve the energy performance at the edges of an IGU.In the olden days, when windows were single-glazed and wood-framed, the window sashes insulated better than the glass. With the air films on both sides, an inch-thick wooden window sash provides about R-2, while a single layer of glass provides just half that. When we switched to double glazing, the glass and wooden sash insulated about equally.With the advent of low-e coatings and low-conductivity gas fills, though, the glazing itself became better insulating than the frames and edges of the glass. All of a sudden, instead of the glass being the weak point, in terms of heat loss, the glass became better-insulating than the edges of the windows. A significant culprit of that window-edge heat loss is the heat-conducting glazing spacer that holds the two pieces of glass apart.Better glazing spacersUntil recently most glazing spacers were made of hollow aluminum channel. Aluminum is an easy material for manufacturers to work with, and the cavity formed by the channel allows a desiccant to be added that adsorbs any water vapor that gets into the insulating glass unit (IGU) during manufacture. RELATED ARTICLES The Revolution in Window Performance — Part OneWindow Performance — the Magic of Low-e CoatingsWindow Performance — Part 3last_img read more

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