Tag: 上海千花网新人自荐

Valverde says De Jong is an important signing

first_imgBarcelona manager Ernesto Valverde insists the signing from Frenkie de Jong from Ajax Amsterdam is an important addition for the club.The Netherlands international completed a €75million move to the Spanish champions on Wednesday but will spend the remainder of the campaign on loan at Ajax.The 21-year-old was also a reported target for both Manchester City and Paris Saint-Germain, with the French champions believed to be closing on his signature earlier in the transfer window but De Jong opted for Barcelona instead.Speaking after Barca’s shock first-leg 2-0 loss to Sevilla in the Copa del Rey quarter-finals, Valverde talked up the signing.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“An important addition,” he said, according to FourFourTwo.“A player with quality and a future that we think is signing with a long perspective for Barca and we wish him the best.”“His success will be the success of the club.”De Jong has three goals and one assist to his name in the Dutch League this season.last_img read more

San Diego Zoo bids bon voyage to Giant Panda Patriarch

first_img KUSI Newsroom San Diego Zoo bids bon voyage to Giant Panda Patriarch New Phase of Conservation Program Begins as Gao Gao Returns to China SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The San Diego Zoo said goodbye Tuesday to a giant panda named Gao Gao, sending him back to his homeland as part of a research loan agreement with the People’s Republic of China.Gao Gao fathered five cubs during his 15 years in San Diego. He was born in the wild in China around 1990 and was taken in by researchers after he sustained injuries that resulted in the loss of part of his left ear. He spent time in the Fengtongzhai Nature Reserve and the Wolong Panda Conservation Center before being brought to the San Diego Zoo in 2003.Gao Gao is headed to the Chinese Center for Research and Conservation for the Giant Panda in Dujiangyan. Animal caretakers from San Diego Zoo Global plan to assist their counterparts at the CCRCGP help acclimate the panda to his new home.“Preparations to move any animal internationally takes a great deal of planning, where the needs of the animal are considered in all preparations,” said San Diego Zoo Senior Keeper Kathy Hawk. “For Gao Gao, it was important that we acclimate him to travel accommodations, adjust his diet and monitor him carefully, to provide him a seamless transition for repatriation to his homeland.”The zoo began an international partnership roughly 25 years ago with the CCRCGP, the China Wildlife Conservation Association and the Chinese Academy of Sciences to further giant panda research and conservation. Due to the success of the partnership, the International Union for Conservation of Nature downgraded the giant panda’s classification from endangered to vulnerable. According to zoo officials, there are roughly 2,000 giant pandas in the wild Tuesday, whereas there were fewer than 1,000 in the wild prior to the zoo’s research collaboration.“Thanks to the work we’ve done, we have met the initial conservation goals we set more than 25 years ago,” said Carmi Penny, the zoo’s director of Collections Husbandry Science. “Now, we must look to the future with a new set of objectives and, along with our collaborators in China, build on current conservation successes while attaining a deeper understanding of the panda.” Show Caption Hide Caption Show Caption Hide Caption Posted: October 30, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Show Caption Hide Caption Updated: 2:04 PMcenter_img 1234 Show Caption Hide Caption Show Caption Hide Caption Photos by Mollie Rivera.The San Diego Zoo’s press release announcing the move is below:The San Diego Zoo said farewell today (Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018) to one of its most iconic animals. Giant Panda Gao Gao (pronounced Gow Gow), a male panda and father of five cubs born at the Zoo, began his journey this morning to the Chinese Center for Research and Conservation for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Dujiangyan, China—in keeping with the current panda research loan agreement with the People’s Republic of China.Gao Gao was transported in his crate and accompanied by a few familiar members of his animal care team, including a veterinarian and keeper staff. Once he arrives in Dujiangyan, team members from both CCRCGP and San Diego Zoo Global will work together to get Gao Gao acclimated to his new surroundings.“Preparations to move any animal internationally takes a great deal of planning, where the needs of the animal are considered in all preparations,” said Kathy Hawk, senior keeper at the San Diego Zoo. “For Gao Gao, it was important that we acclimate him to travel accommodations, adjust his diet and monitor him carefully, to provide him a seamless transition for repatriation to his homeland.”Gao Gao’s return to China comes at the same time the Zoo’s giant panda conservation program enters a new chapter, in which the Zoo, along with colleagues in China, are working to determine and redefine the future of panda conservation and research. Decades ago, when San Diego Zoo Global started working with giant pandas, the species was on the verge of extinction. The Zoo became part of an international collaboration that included CCRCGP, the China Wildlife Conservation Association, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and other accredited zoos and conservation organizations, in an unprecedented effort to prevent a panda extinction event.Now, 25 years later, researchers and keepers have learned a great deal about panda behavior, pregnancy, births, and maternal and geriatric care. Today, the giant panda population is on the rise, with nearly 2,000 giant pandas existing in the wild. Their increased numbers, along with policies put in place by the Chinese government, led the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Threatened Species to downlist pandas—from Endangered to Vulnerable—meaning that while threats to pandas’ survival remain high, indicators show the species is in less danger of extinction than before, and that conservation efforts are working. In the wake of this accomplishment, conservationists are now determined to create a plan to continue the conservation momentum.“Thanks to the work we’ve done, we have met the initial conservation goals we set more than 25 years ago,” said Carmi Penny, director of Collections Husbandry Science at the San Diego Zoo. “Now, we must look to the future with a new set of objectives and, along with our collaborators in China, build on current conservation successes while attaining a deeper understanding of the panda.”Guests can visit the Zoo’s other two giant pandas, 27-year-old Bai Yun (pronounced bye yoon) and her 6-year-old son Xiao Liwu (pronounced sshyaoww lee woo) in their exhibit in Panda Canyon.Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes on-site wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global. Show Caption Hide Caption KUSI Newsroom, October 30, 2018last_img read more

San Diego Convention Center Update

first_img Updated: 7:26 PM Posted: April 1, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitter April 1, 2019 Steve Bosh center_img Steve Bosh, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego’s years-long-effort to expand the Convention Center has suddenly gotten a lot more difficult.The city decided not to make a 9.4 million dollar payment to gain control of the land needed for expansion.The leaseholder on the five acres of land the city needs for expansion, is held by Fifth Avenue Landing Company, which is committed to building two hotels on the site. Last year the city agreed to pay Fifth Avenue 33 million dollars for the lease, if the voters approved a hotel tax increase that was to happen in 2018.The city was to make three payments this year, the first being 9.4 million, but the vote was delayed until 2020.The land is owned by the port and was leased to 5th avenue in 2010. Five years later, the city wanted to buy the lease from 5th Avenue for 14 million dollars, but defaulted on the payment and the lease reverted back to 5th avenue.The 14 million dollars it would have cost the taxpayers to get the lease in 2015, is now 33 million in 2019. San Diego Convention Center Updatelast_img read more

PHOTOS Heavnly Donuts Holds Grand Reopening Founding Family Returns To Wilmington

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Infiniti kicks Western Europe to the curb amid restructuring

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De De Pyaar De day 5 box office collection Ajay Devgns film

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Cattle farm owner caretaker killed in Msingh

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UT Marine Science Institute Still In Shambles After Harvey

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East Baltimore Business Aims to Take the Chore Out of Laundry

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