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Government draws up blacklist of people whose passports are to be confiscated

first_img RSF_en ZimbabweAfrica Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono denied bail Follow the news on Zimbabwe News Help by sharing this information Zimbabwean court must free imprisoned journalist who is unwell November 27, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa ZimbabweAfrica to go further December 12, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Government draws up blacklist of people whose passports are to be confiscated Reports News Organisation Reporters Without Borders voiced outrage today at the government’s action in drawing up a blacklist of some 60 leading Zimbabweans, some currently living abroad, whose passports are to be confiscated and cancelled to prevent them from travelling abroad any more. They reportedly include independent newspaper owner Trevor Ncube (photo), at least five other independent media personalities, an expatriate lawyer and journalist, and the owner and former executives of the banned Daily News newspaper. Receive email alerts September 1, 2020 Find out more November 12, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders voiced outrage today at the government’s action in drawing up a blacklist of some 60 leading Zimbabweans, some currently living abroad, whose passports are to be confiscated and cancelled to prevent them from travelling abroad any more. They reportedly include independent newspaper owner Trevor Ncube, at least five other independent media personalities, an expatriate lawyer and journalist, and the owner and former executives of the banned Daily News newspaper.“This new scheme is Kafkaesque,” Reporters Without Borders said. “How repressive can Robert Mugabe’s government get before it is called to account? Zimbabwe is a member of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and is under South Africa’s influence, yet it is not threatened with any coercive measure over its repeated press violations. Action to help Zimbabweans recover their civil and political liberties is long overdue.”In a letter from registrar general Tobaiwa Mudede to immigration chief Elasto Mugwadi on 28 November, the government ordered the withdrawal and cancellation of the passports of all persons on “the following list.” A local source said there were 64 names on the list, including businessman Strive Masiyiwa, owner of the Associated Newspapers of Zimbabwe (ANZ), which publishes the Daily News, former Daily News editors Geoffrey Nyarota and Nqobile Nyathi, and Daily News reporters Lloyd Mudiwa and Basildon Peta. Beatrice Mtetwa, a leading lawyer who won the Committee to Protect Journalists’ 2005 international press freedom prize, and former Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation journalist Caroline Gombakomba, who now works for the Voice of America in the United States, are also on the list, which was sent with an accompanying memo to all border posts.The measure follows an amendment four months ago to article 22 of the constitution allowing the government to withdraw any citizen’s passport when there is reason to suspect they could harm national interests, defence interests or the state economy when abroad.—————9.12.2005 – Government confiscates newspaper publisher’s passportReporters Without Borders protested after the Zimbabwe authorities seized the passport of publisher Trevor Ncube and called for it to be immediately returned to him.The publisher, who is based in South Africa, had his passport taken as he left Bulawayo airport to join a family wedding party.“There seems to be no end to the array of harassment used against journalists in Zimbabwe”, said Reporters Without Borders. “The use of such draconian methods shows once again the determination of the authorities to put an end to freedom of opinion in Zimbabwe.”Ncube runs two weeklies in Zimbabwe, The Standard and The Zimbabwe Independent. He also in 2002 bought the majority of shares in the South African weekly Mail and Guardian that previously belonged to the British daily The Guardian. These three publications are all highly critical of President Robert Mugabe.Two officials from the secret police Central Intelligence Organisation confiscated Ncube’s passport after he had left Bulawayo airport and was preparing to head into the city centre to attend his brother’s wedding.He was not arrested, but the confiscation of his passport prevents him from leaving the country. He is the first victim of a new constitutional amendment that has, since August, allowed the Zimbabwean authorities to confiscate the passport of any citizen. Newslast_img read more

One person dead, four rescued after boat slams into drawbridge near New Orleans

first_imgSt. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office via FacebookBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News(NEW ORLEANS) — A boater who had been missing in the waters of Lake Pontchartrain near New Orleans was found dead on Sunday after being ejected from a pleasure craft that slammed into a highway drawbridge, authorities said.The crash occurred about 7 p.m. on Saturday when the boat, with four other people aboard, hit the Highway 11 drawbridge on the northeast side of the lake, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.A search for the overboard boater was immediately launched as the Coast Guard deployed a 29-foot rescue boat and helicopter crew to the area.Officials said the Coast Guard station in New Orleans deployed a 29-foot rescue boat and a helicopter crew to assist in the search for the missing boater. The St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries also joined the search.The search was suspended Sunday when the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office discovered the missing boater unresponsive around 11:30 a.m., according to the Coast Guard.Coast Guard officials said the other four occupants of the boat were taken to University Medical Center, New Orleans, including two who were flown there by helicopter, according to the St. Tammany Fire Protection.The cause of the crash remains under investigation.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Induction training proves its worth

first_img Previous Article Next Article Employers need to ratchet up their induction training programmes if they areto retain key staff in a full employment market, according to two new separatepieces of research. Research from Cranfield University School of Management, out this month,shows that more than one in three employers – 37 per cent – have problemsretaining staff who have been employed for less than a year. The longer someonestays with a firm, the easier it is to hang on to them, the research suggests,with only 21 per cent saying they had trouble hanging on to staff who had beenwith them for more than three years. And concentrating on a new employee’s first day at work could make a realdifference, according to recruitment website reed.co.uk. Its survey of morethan 5,000 workers and job hunters found that nearly one in 10 had considerednot going back after a disastrous first day. And, a tiny minority didn’t go back. Three per cent of respondents said theydidn’t return on the second day because of something their new company did. Afurther 4 per cent failed to return because of a first-day mistake they hadmade. “It’s important that organisations integrate new people as quickly aspossible into the work environment,” said Paul Rapaccioli, director atreed.co.uk. “The first day at a new job is especially stressful andemployers need to think about how they manage it. Full induction training needsto be in place and it needs to start from day one.” Some employers are already taking the induction process seriously. Forexample, Tesco is currently reviewing its induction. For years, the supermarketgiant has run first-day induction programmes off-site for all new staff. “We talk about the history of Tesco, the brand and our values,”said Linda Summerfield, resourcing project manager. “We’re now trying tofind out how much information people retain, what’s appropriate and what isn’t.Our aim is to make new recruits feel comfortable in their role and support themthrough the emotional challenge of starting a new job.” Summerfield is also planning to put Tesco’s new starter pack on to CD-Rom.”Our paper-based product is full of information but, to be honest, it canbe a bit off-putting. A CD-Rom will enable more interaction and bring it to life.With 80 per cent of the UK population now having access to a PC, this has to bethe way forward,” she said. Revamping graduate induction training has had a major impact on retention atopticians Dolland & Aitchison. “Where once we would lose 50 or 60 per cent of graduates within thefirst year of them becoming qualified, we now retain 85 per cent,” saidprofessional services director Dr Rob Hogan. Three years ago, Dolland & Aitchison introduced a week-long inductionprocess for new graduates to introduce them to the customer-service side of thejob. “Rather than concentrate on the technical aspects, we wanted ourgraduates to be able to convert their knowledge and skills into jargon-freelanguage that members of the public would feel comfortable with,” Hogansaid. The firm has now decided to capitalise on the success of its induction programmeby introducing something similar for non-graduate staff, starting this yearwith dispensing opticians. “Nothing much has changed in the way firmsinduct new staff, but this really does work,” he said. www.reed.co.ukwww.cranfield.ac.uk/som/rciBy Lucie Carrington Related posts:No related photos. Induction training proves its worthOn 1 Feb 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

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