Category: zzwziycgdydtvija

Apples 4Q change in iPhone sales disclosure jar investorsApples 4Q change in iPhone sales disclosure jar investors

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – Apple’s faithful customers aren’t snapping up iPhones quite as enthusiastically as anticipated heading into the crucial holiday shopping season.But the latest models costing $1,000 and more are popular enough to keep propelling profits ever higher for the world’s most prosperous company.The mixed bag emerged in the quarterly results Apple released Thursday amid jitters about how the company and the rest of the technology industry will fare in the face of myriad threats to growth. Those include increased government regulation, the escalating U.S. trade war with China and the spectre of rising interest rates crimping economic growth.Apple’s performance for the July-through-September period and its revenue outlook for holiday season evidently weren’t enough to ease investors’ concerns.The Cupertino, California, company rattled Wall Street even more by unexpectedly announcing that it will no longer disclose the number of iPhones it sells each quarter, beginning with the current period ending in December.“This is a bit of a gut punch for everyone used to more transparency,” said Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives.Apple’s stock almost 7 per cent to $207.67 in extended trading after all the news came out.Other major smartphone makers don’t reveal their quarterly shipments of their devices either, but Apple has broken down its iPhone numbers ever since the phone’s debut 11 years ago. The abrupt change in policy raised suspicions that management might be trying to mask a downturn in the popularity of the product that generates most of Apple’s profits.The change apparently was triggered by Apple’s frustration with investors’ fixation on its iPhone sales while glossing over other key areas, such as the robust growth in its services division that collects commissions on app sales and handles subscriptions to its music-streaming service.“The number of (iPhone) units sold during any quarter has not been necessarily representative of the underlying strength of our business,” Luca Maestri, Apple’s chief financial officer, told analysts in a conference call.Although there may be some logic to the rationale for the long term, “this is going to be a difficult pill to swallow in the short term,” Ives said. “It’s like suddenly telling people (in the U.S.) that they have to start driving on the left side of the road.”Apple CEO Tim Cook also sought to reassure analysts during the conference call with an explanation that indicated the company expects to keep making more money even if iPhone sales should falter.“This is a little bit like if you go to the market and you push your cart up to the cashier and she says or he says, ‘How many units do you have in there?’” Cook said. “It doesn’t matter a lot how many units there are in there in terms of the overall value of what’s in the cart.”Analysts had expected Apple to sell 78 million iPhones during the holiday season, but now the company isn’t going to reveal whether it hit the target or not.Apple earned $14.1 billion, a 32 per cent increase from the same time last year during the past quarter. Earnings per share came in at $2.91, topping the average estimate of $2.79 among analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research.Revenue for the period climbed 20 per cent from last year to $62.9 billion.Apple sold 46.9 million iPhones in the past quarter, slightly below analyst estimates.The company Apple released its latest iPhones, models selling from $1,000 to $1,500, at the tail end of the quarter, and those appeared to get off to a strong start. Apple fetched an average of $793 per iPhone in the quarter, up 28 per cent from the same time last year.Thanks to last year’s release of the first iPhone to cost $1,000 , the average price has increased by at least 11 per cent in each of the past four quarters. If Apple follows that trend in the current quarter, the average iPhone price should rise above $800 for the first time in a show of people’s love affair with the device.But now everyone will be left to guess whether Apple clears that financial hurdle during the holiday season._____Elements of this story were generated by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research.last_img read more

Mob attack on TNA meetingMob attack on TNA meeting

A mob attacked a Tamil National Alliance (TNA) meeting in Killinochchi today, TNA MP E. Sarawanabavan said.The MP said that over 50 people with stones and poles in their hands attacked the premises while several leading TNA MPs were present. He said that TNA MPs S. Sridaran, M.A. Sumanthiran and Mavai Senathirajah were among those present at the time of the attack. The mob initially staged a demonstration outside the premises but later attempted to force their way in. Stones were thrown towards the building damaging property and injuring at least 13 people.“The mob came with the lion flag in their hand. The building we were in was damaged a lot. Two people were arrested and later freed,” he said. Sarawanabavan said that the attack took place despite a police presence in the area. (Colombo Gazette) read more

Peacekeeping assessments more than 1100 million in arrears UN official saysPeacekeeping assessments more than 1100 million in arrears UN official says

Peacekeeping operations had had healthy cash flow balances every month of the year, which was important since the funds supported not only peacekeeping missions, but the tribunals for both the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, Under-Secretary-General for Management Catherine Bertini told a news conference at UN Headquarters in New York.The peacekeeping arrears in 2003 were well below the $1,652 million total in October 2002.At the end of October 2003, 105 Member States had made no payments towards their 2003 war crimes tribunal assessments, 18 countries had made partial payments and only 63 had paid in full, she said.Major contributors to the regular budget owed $360 million at the end of October and the next 63 contributors owed $106 million, totalling $466 million. One hundred and twenty-seven small contributors had paid in full, she said, compared with last year, when only 117 countries had paid their dues in full by the end of the year.If the countries that owed regular dues did not pay up by the end of the year, the UN would end the year with a deficit of $12 million, Ms. Bertini said. read more

New house prices rose 02 per cent in October StatsCanNew house prices rose 02 per cent in October StatsCan

by The Canadian Press Posted Dec 13, 2012 8:47 am MDT OTTAWA – Statistics Canada says its price index for new housing rose 0.2 per cent in October.The agency says the combined metropolitan region of Toronto and Oshawa, as well as the Montreal region, were the top contributors to the increase.Toronto and Oshawa prices were up due to market conditions, while higher material and labour costs and new building code requirements pushed prices up in Montreal.Monthly prices declined 0.2 per cent in Charlottetown and were down 0.1 per cent in the combined metropolitan region of Sudbury and Thunder Bay, Ont.Prices were unchanged in 11 of the 21 metropolitan regions surveyed in October.On a year-over-year basis, the index was up 2.4 per cent compared with October 2011. New house prices rose 0.2 per cent in October: StatsCan read more

Ohio State mens tennis team makes racket on road to NCAA ChampionshipOhio State mens tennis team makes racket on road to NCAA Championship

The Ohio State men’s tennis team’s dream of winning a national title is still alive after the Buckeyes defeated their opponents in the first two rounds of the NCAA Championship Tournament this weekend. OSU was able to shut out Notre Dame and Ball State, 4-0, respectively in the first and second rounds of the tournament. The team will now advance to the third round of the championship Thursday, when it will play Tulsa. Tulsa caused an upset in the bracket with a 4-3 victory against No. 13 seed Texas on Saturday. “They take everything seriously,” OSU coach Ty Tucker said of his team. The last four rounds of the tournament will be held at Stanford’s Taube Tennis Center. If the Buckeyes beat Tulsa in the Sweet Sixteen, they will play in their first matchup with a seeded opponent. Depending on the outcome of the other teams’ match, the Buckeyes will face either No. 5-seeded Baylor or No. 12-seeded UCLA. The Buckeyes didn’t play either team this season. OSU had a successful start to the tournament with home-court advantage. However, the team will now travel to an outdoor court, something the Buckeyes haven’t had much experience with yet this season. But the team isn’t completely unprepared. Redshirt sophomore Devin McCarthy said Tucker had the team outdoors, practicing as much as possible in the days before the tournament began. But, McCarthy added, the team still needs to play outside more. On Friday, the team got a little taste of what kind of weather it might meet in California when it played in humid, 80-degree weather against Ball State. “We have to take what we can get,” redshirt freshman Peter Kobelt said of Friday’s weather. “It’s the kind of stuff we’ll deal with if we go out to California.” Whatever weather the Buckeyes face in California, the team seems excited just to be competing. “It’s quite an experience,” senior Matt Allare said. “I’ve never been (to Stanford). I’m excited to see what it’s like.” “It’s a little bit different,” freshman Blaz Rola said. “You see a lot more excitement. … There’s more at stake, but to win any tournament is a big deal.” The Buckeyes play their next round at 6 p.m. Thursday. If they win, they will continue on the road to the National Championship by playing in the fourth round at 7 p.m. Saturday. read more

Vigilante neighbourhood watch group forms in Birmingham after failed bid for moreVigilante neighbourhood watch group forms in Birmingham after failed bid for more

Tracy, 48, said: “We stress to our members that if they see something, they should notify the police first.”We would like to join up with the police, but we want to be able to make our own decisions on where the help is really needed, and not where the police tell us to be.”A spokesman for West Midlands Police said officers were aware of multiple groups but advised members to join police-approved Streetwatch programmes instead. “We’re vigilantes, but we’re vigilantes with a twist, working within the law and not against it.”Our group is a central place for the local community to come together to log crimes, comment and help stop crime in the area.”Tracy added ‘We Stand Determined’ is not designed to undermine West Midlands Police, who she said can only do what they can with the funding they are given.But the group say this doesn’t solve the problem of reduced bobbies on the beat – so they were forced to themselves. We Stand Determined don’t want to stop at patrols and have big plans to generate a totally new level of support in the area by organising buddy systems for the elderly and defence classes for anyone who feels they need to be able to protect themselves.They soon hope to grow bigger and have representatives based in every area of the country to work so Wayne, Tracy and Michael can help everyone sleep a little easier. The group said it wants to work with West Midlands Police but provide a new line of defence for concerned residents The group said it wants to work with West Midlands Police but provide a new line of defence for concerned residentsCredit:Michael Scott/ Caters News Agency West Midlands Police said it had advised members to join police-approved Streetwatch groups instead The group said it feared crime was spiralling out of control across Birmingham “There has been a recent spate of crime in Birmingham recently and Solihull in particular has fallen victim to an increase of just under 1,500 more cases so far this year.”People needed someone to turn to, someone who will listen and visit them in their home if a constituent is fearful for their own safety. The group said it feared crime was spiralling out of control across BirminghamCredit:Caters News Agency Hundreds of residents have formed a ‘vigilante’ neighbourhood watch group following a failed campaign to increase the number of police officers on the streets. The community watchdog group, known as ‘We Stand Determined’, stage twice-weekly patrols across Birmingham since it was set up on social media three weeks ago.Members say they are working together to report any dangers the community may face across Britain’s second largest city amid fears crime is spiralling out of control. The group originally was an unsuccessful petition to get more police in the area.Three organisers, only known as Wayne, Tracy and Michael, said they founded the group after discovering a friend had been attacked in his home by thieves armed with hammers. The trio insist the group is non-violent and wants to work in partnership with the police but also as a new line of defence for neighbours concerned by crime.Solihull-based college lecturer Wayne, 47, who did not wish to reveal his surname for fears over his safety, said: “The way our group started, and the reaction we’ve had, has showed us how much local communities need groups like us to fill in the gaps the authorities simply don’t have the funding for. West Midlands Police said it had advised members to join police-approved Streetwatch groups insteadCredit:Michael Scott/Caters News Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

A new top ten zinc mineA new top ten zinc mine

first_imgMMG Ltd has announced approval of the updated development plan for the Dugald River zinc project in northwest Queensland, Australia. The updated plan for Dugald River includes a mine production rate of 1.5 Mt/y, construction of a concentrator and annual production of some 160,000 t/y of zinc in zinc concentrate, plus byproducts, over an estimated 28 year mine life. This places Dugald River within the world’s top ten zinc mines when operational.“We are positive about the long-term fundamentals for zinc,” MMG Chief Executive Officer Andrew Michelmore said. “This decision reflects our confidence in zinc at a time of shrinking global supply. Dugald River remains one of the world’s highest grade undeveloped zinc deposits,” Michelmore said.“Under the updated plan, Dugald River will come online at around a time when significant global zinc supply will disappear through mine closures,” he said.The expected remaining cost of the project to first shipment of concentrate is around $750 million plus interest costs.“The updated development plan reflects a prudent response to mine geotechnical conditions,” Michelmore said. “By taking the time to understand the unique characteristics of the orebody, we now have a robust plan for Dugald River that maximises long-term value for shareholders,” he said.Discussions to amend funding arrangements have commenced with MMG’s existing lenders. Agreements with key energy, logistics and service providers will be revised based on the updated project plan.Following satisfaction of remaining conditions, construction of remaining surface infrastructure facilities would commence in 2016 with first production from a Dugald River concentrator expected during the first half of 2018.“During development and operation, the Dugald River project would provide 28 years of economic, employment and revenue contribution to Cloncurry and Queensland,” Michelmore said. “These decisions are tough during low commodity price cycles but we are confident that is just the time to invest. Our commitment to operational excellence and demonstrated financial discipline positions us to maximise the value of the operation across the zinc price cycle.”Access to the Dugald River orebody via development declines in 2013 led to the identification of geotechnical aspects and ground conditions more challenging than prior assumptions. This prompted a review of the proposed mine development method followed by a trial stoping program, value engineering and additional project studies.Dugald River is located approximately 65 km northwest of Cloncurry, in Queensland.The Queensland Resources Council (QRC) has welcomed the announcement. QRC’s Deputy Chief Executive Greg Lane said the announcement was good news during tough times. “With global supply tightening, this announcement is good news for Queensland and even better news for Cloncurry and Townsville, which are set to benefit from jobs, both in and supporting the mine.”“The revenue from royalties and exports is also set to benefit the state. I applaud MMG for pushing on and making tough decisions during the low commodity price cycle.”This announcement is also a huge vote of confidence in northwest Queensland, to which the resources sector contributed $2.2 billion during 2013-14.“Australia leads the world in economic zinc resources and one of Queensland’s resource strengths is the diversity of commodities we produce,” Lane said. “And with MMG’s Century mine winding down, this partial replacement production of zinc is good news for all Queenslanders.”last_img read more

McGuinness We have to dig much deeper in relation to St VincentsMcGuinness We have to dig much deeper in relation to St Vincents

first_imgUpdated 1.05pm THE CHAIR OF the Public Accounts Committee John McGuinness has said the public release by St Vincent’s Hospital of a letter sent by its CEO to the HSE today shows “poor judgement”.The letter, which gives details of additional payments to high-level staff on top of their HSE funded salaries, was sent to the HSE yesterday and released to the media  last night. McGuinness said he believes the hospital “has chosen to leak this at a time when people might not notice”.His colleague on the PAC, Sinn Féin’s Mary Lou McDonald, said this afternoon she found the revelations “deeply shocking” and said they showed a “blatant abuse of public policy”.“The timing of the release of these details by St Vincent’s highlights its arrogant disregard for the notion of transparency and accountability,” she said in a statement.McDonald was echoing the remarks of McGuinness who told TheJournal.ie earlier: “It shows contempt for the whole process of accountability and transparency.It is an attempt, in my opinion, to hide something.The letter revealed that CEO Nicholas Jermyn receives an additional €136,591 on top of his HSE funded salary of €136,282 – plus a car allowance of €19,796.He accused the hospital of previously trying to “stonewall” the HSE and his committee, when “they had they information at their fingertips”.“To do it a day before Christmas Eve shows a particular trend in how they do their business,” he commented.McDonald added: “Having first of all refused to reveal these details, the hospital has now released them to the media the day before Christmas eve in a blatant attempt to minimise the story.”Digging deepHowever, McGuinness said the late release of the information “won’t wash” with the committee, which will be “digging deep” when executives appear before members in January.“We will ensure that, not just this information, but information about everything else is provided, including what Senator John Crown has said,” he added. “There’s no doubt about this, we have to dig much deeper in relation to St Vincent’s.McGuinness was referring to remarks made by Senator Crown last week about members of staff at the hospital deliberately charging private health insurers for cancer drugs which had been given to the hospital for free – something the hospital has denied.HSE managementThe PAC chair said the details of the high salaries paid to executives also raise “serious questions” about the HSE’s knowledge of what was going on.“The other issue is why the HSE didn’t properly manage those accounts, why they had to wait until now to find out,” he said. “They should have know that it was not acceptable to have this type of arrangement.“They never dug deep enough to find out and never bothered to have proper governance of public money,” he added.- additional reporting Hugh O’Connell First published 00.01amRelated: St Vincent’s Hospital CEO paid €136.5k on top of HSE salary>last_img read more

Indonésie trois éléphants de Sumatra retrouvés morts après avoir attaqué un villageIndonésie trois éléphants de Sumatra retrouvés morts après avoir attaqué un village

first_imgIndonésie : trois éléphants de Sumatra retrouvés morts après avoir attaqué un villageUn village situé à l’ouest de l’Indonésie, dans la province d’Aceh sur l’île de Sumatra, a été attaqué par une harde d’éléphants. Hier, les autorités, ont annoncé que trois des pachydermes ont été retrouvés morts suite à cette attaque.Appartenant à une espèce menacée, par le braconnage comme par la destruction de son habitat, une dizaine d’éléphants sauvages de Sumatra, “est venue dans le village, dévastant des maisons et des champs. Une cinquantaine d’habitants ont été contraints de fuir leurs habitations”, a expliqué Bakhtiar, un responsable de Yayasan Leuser International, une association locale de protection de l’environnement. De retour dans leur village, les habitants auraient découvert les cadavres de trois pachydermes. Pour eux, ils sont probablement morts après avoir ingurgité du poison utilisé pour tuer les cochons sauvages. Une enquête a alors été ouverte par l’agence de la faune d’Aceh.À lire aussiDes éléphants viennent en aide à une mère pour sauver son petit coincé dans un trouComme le souligne Abubakar Chek, le chef de cette agence, “les conflits entre éléphants et habitants sont de plus en plus fréquents dans cette zone et nous cherchons une solution pour que les éléphants la quittent”. Sur l’île de Sumatra, de telles attaques sont de plus en plus fréquentes. Eléphants et tigres sauvages voient leur habitat de plus en plus réduit, par l’abattage illégal et les plantations de palmiers à huile ou d’acacias. Les animaux sont donc bien plus en contact avec les humains qu’auparavant, ces derniers ne supportant plus de voir leurs cultures, et parfois leurs habitations détruites. Il est alors fréquent que des éléphants ou des tigres soient tués.A ce jour, il ne resterait pas plus de 3.350 éléphants de Sumatra, et comme le souligne le WWF, leur population ne cesse de diminuer.Le 11 décembre 2010 à 09:16 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Wanted felon holes up in SUV prompting police standoffWanted felon holes up in SUV prompting police standoff

first_imgWanted felon holes up in SUV, prompting police standoff SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A wanted felon believed to be armed with a gun holed up Thursday inside an SUV outside a motel near Imperial Beach when officers tried to arrest him, prompting an hours-long standoff.National City police requested backup from their counterparts in the city of San Diego about 10:15 a.m. while trying to get the suspect into custody in the 1000 block of Outer Road in Palm City, near Hollister Street and just east of Interstate 5, SDPD Sgt. Michael Stirk said.The man, whose identity was not immediately available, also apparently had been involved in a hit-and-run traffic accident, the sergeant said. Where and when that crash occurred was unclear.Officers with pistols and rifles drawn surrounded the SUV in which the suspect — who reportedly at some point had made a comment about committing “suicide by cop” — was barricaded as negotiators tried to persuade him to surrender peaceably.The stalemate was ongoing in the early afternoon, Stirk said. August 22, 2019 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Posted: August 22, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

VW Tarok teases us with another pickup truck concept in New YorkVW Tarok teases us with another pickup truck concept in New York

first_img Apr 19 • Check out the gory details in Honda’s IIHS crash-tested HR-V More about 2019 Volkswagen Jetta 46 Photos Review • 2019 Volkswagen Jetta Review Concept Cars Trucks reading • VW Tarok teases us with another pickup truck concept in New York Volkswagen keeps hinting that it might, one day, bring a pickup truck to the US. Last year we saw the Atlas Tanoak pickup truck concept, and now there’s a second VW pickup truck concept that suggests such a model is getting more likely.Volkswagen introduced the Tarok pickup truck concept at the 2019 New York Auto Show this week. The Tarok concept isn’t new, having made its initial debut at the Sao Paolo International Motor Show last November, but it’s new to the US, and it’s here for a very specific purpose. As VW stated in its release, the truck will allow VW “to gauge market reaction for a truly versatile and compact entry-level pickup.”Enlarge ImageAnother New York show, another VW truck concept. Steven Pham/Roadshow The Tarok isn’t a terribly large pickup truck, measuring just 193.5 inches long. For context’s sake, the shortest Toyota Tacoma you can buy is nearly 20 inches longer at 212.3 inches. It rides on Volkswagen MQB platform, which also underpins small cars like the Golf, Jetta and Tiguan. The Tarok is one of the largest vehicles to rock this platform, showing just how versatile it could be.Those concerned about fitting things in a short bed need not worry, as the Tarok has a trick up its sleeve. Instead of treating the bed and cab as separate entities, the Tarok has a panel that can open up and extend the bed into the cab, allowing the truck to fit items that are up to 73.2 inches long. Open the tailgate and you get another 25.8 inches, but then you also lose the backstop that the tailgate normally provides. On the whole, it can handle 2,271 pounds of payload. The rear panel locks electronically from the inside, so people shouldn’t be sneaking into your truck.Volkswagen Tarok conceptEnlarge ImageWhereas the Atlas Tanoak had a design flourish that sort of made it appear like a body-on-frame pickup, the Tarok has no qualms about wearing its unibody construction on its sleeve. Steven Pham/Roadshow Since it’s a small truck, it doesn’t need a big engine. The concept sports the same 1.4-liter turbocharged I4 found in the Jetta, putting out the same 147 horsepower as the family sedan. Its all-wheel drive system features driving modes for snow and off-roading. Speaking of off-roading, it’s decently capable, with 9.6 inches of ground clearance, a 23.8-degree approach angle and a 26.4-degree departure angle, which is better than a standard Chevy Colorado. Hell, its departure angle is actually better than any midsize truck currently on sale in the US, according to our midsize-truck comparison list.While the VW Atlas Tanoak pickup concept definitely looked like a concept, the Tarok looks much closer to production. Some elements are carried over from the Tanoak, like the focus on horizontal lighting in the front, but everything else looks a bit more rooted in real-world sensibility. As for the interior, it’s pretty darn close to most modern VWs, with a large infotainment screen and a second screen in the gauge cluster. Nearly all of the remaining switchgear could have been borrowed from my personal 2016 Golf SportWagen.But while the truck looks ready to roll, that doesn’t mean it’s a shoo-in for US sales. VW said in the Tarok’s press release that nothing is set in stone, but when we talked to VW of America boss Scott Keogh at the Geneva Motor Show, Keogh told Roadshow that VW will want to do it right. While it could produce something based on its tie-up with Ford, Keogh is keen not to have a repeat of the Routan, which was a Dodge Grand Caravan with a VW badge that didn’t do anything to boost its reputation. With a properly small, yet still versatile unibody pickup, VW might have found the white space it’s looking for. The only question that remains is whether or not the market will welcome it with open arms (and wallets). New York Auto Show 2019 Volkswagen 0 VW Tarok pickup concept is in New York to gauge your reaction See All • May 29 • 2020 Ford Escape: Everything there is to knowcenter_img Share your voice 2019 Volkswagen Jetta GLI first drive: Long live the sport sedan Apr 19 • Volkswagen’s US CEO says around $25,000 would be a smart price for a small pickup Post a comment Tags 2019 Honda Passport review: All the SUV you really need More From Roadshow Apr 19 • Acura MDX PMC Edition is a hand-assembled SUV in brilliant red paint 2019 Ford Raptor review: The off-road truck that does it all New York Auto Show 2019 Chevrolet Ford Toyota Volkswagen Dodgelast_img read more

Brookfield buys Hiranandanis Mumbai assets for Rs 6700 croreBrookfield buys Hiranandanis Mumbai assets for Rs 6700 crore

first_imgBrookfield Asset Management Inc., the Canadian alternative asset manager, has purchased 4.5 million office and retail space in Mumbai from real estate developer Hiranandani for about Rs 6,700 crore. There was speculation since June about two contenders for the deal — the Canadian firm and GIC, the Singapore government’s sovereign wealth fund. GIC reportedly withdrew from the race.On Thursday, the deal was reported by the Economic Times and other publications.The assets in Powai are jointly owned by Niranjan and Surendra Hiranandani and come amid growing demand among global investors to put money in India’s commercial real estate market.In June, the Business Standard had reported that the deal at Rs 6,700 crore was “fully priced,” citing an investor who did not wanted to be named. “At Rs 15,000 per sq ft, the deal is in line with market rates. Even residential properties command that kind of value,” he told the daily.His views were also echoed by a Mumbai-based fund manager. “It looks like a fully priced deal. They would have built the assets over the years and they expect a fair value for it,” Rubi Arya, vice-chairman of Milestone Capital, told the Business Standard.Brookfield Asset Management Inc. has assets worth $250 billion worldwide and operates in about 30 countries.In July, Brookfield Asset Management and State Bank of India had announced setting up of a fund to buy distressed assets in India.”SBI and Brookfield propose to form a joint venture (JV), whereby Brookfield will commit approximately Rs 7,000 crore and SBI up to 5 percent of total investments into stressed assets,” India’s state-run lender had said in a press statement on July 20.last_img read more

UT Marine Science Institute Still In Shambles After HarveyUT Marine Science Institute Still In Shambles After Harvey

first_img Share Photo via Twitter @UTexasNutritionIt’s been four months since Hurricane Harvey decimated the coastal town of Port Aransas.Jagged splinters of wood stick out of the shoreline — all that’s left of a pier that once stretched 100 yards into the Gulf of Mexico.White plastic tarps flap in the whipping December wind atop dozens of roofs that failed to withstand the brutal force of a hurricane. Small buildings nearby are caved in, while sturdier ones are stripped to the studs to prevent the spread of mold.The 72-acre plot looks like an abandoned town from the 1970s.Only it’s not an abandoned town. It’s the University of Texas at Austin’s once-thriving Marine Science Institute, the first of its kind on the Gulf. It’s been four months since Hurricane Harvey decimated the coastal town of Port Aransas — where the institute calls home — and officials still are months from bringing research efforts back online.Faculty and students have been displaced, many to Texas A&M University’s Corpus Christi campus, millions of dollars of equipment has been destroyed and decades of research that cannot be replicated has been lost.Institute leaders still are assessing the damage, which already has filled a 3,500-line spreadsheet, but the cost to rebuild will be in the “many tens of millions of dollars,” said Robert Dickey, institute director.But they will rebuild, Dickey said. And they will be better prepared for the next hurricane.“We want it done as quickly as possible, but it has to be done right,” Dickey told the Houston Chronicle . “We’ll apply what we learned from this storm to our redesign.”Bryan Black thought he was prepared for Harvey.In the days leading up to the storm, he and his fellow researchers stacked their computers and other sensitive equipment on desks, covering everything with clear plastic tarps. They halted experiments and locked up scientific samples on shelves high above the ground. They bought food, water and other supplies, thinking they’d ride out the storm at the institute.But in the middle of a morning meeting Aug. 24, everyone’s phones started buzzing. Harvey was now expected to make landfall as a Category 3 hurricane. They needed to evacuate the island by nightfall.Scientists started euthanizing thousands of research fish that wouldn’t survive without constant attention. They secured rescue turtles in a sturdy metal building and transported about 30 marine birds — including pelicans — to an employee’s parents’ home for safekeeping.Black gathered boxes of important documents and slides of samples, stacking them in his car alongside his family’s personal belongings. He picked up his 6-year-old son, Henry, from kindergarten and drove to a hotel about 200 miles away in McAllen to wait out the storm.When Harvey finally made landfall Aug. 25 between Port Aransas and Port O’Connor, it had upgraded to a Category 4 — the first of that magnitude to hit Texas in 56 years.Winds whipped through the island at 130 mph, ripping into buildings and sending gravel smashing through windows. The storm toppled power lines, leaving the area without electricity for at least a week, and annihilated the plumbing that drew salt water to campus.Three football fields’ worth of roofing was destroyed, student housing either collapsed or flooded significantly, and thousands of research fish died after going for days without oxygen.A drilling rig broke free, slamming into the school’s research pier and destroying instruments that reported environmental data back to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.Even the school’s newly renovated Estuarine Research Center — built to withstand a Category 3 hurricane and 130 mph winds — was no match for Harvey. The center’s roof failed under the storm’s intense, wind-driven rain, filling its seven principal labs on the second and third floors with water and destroying millions of dollars worth of equipment.Black was lucky — neither his laboratory nor office were severely damaged by the storm. But when Dickey finally returned to the institute five days later, he found not a single building untouched.“I’ve been through seven or eight hurricanes; I’ve brought facilities back before,” Dickey said. “This is probably the worst damage I’ve seen institutionally in all my years.”There still are days when the internet connection in Port Aransas is too spotty for Victoria Congdon to make it to class.Congdon’s classmates were scattered across South Texas by Harvey, so her professors decided to teach online for the rest of the semester to accommodate everyone.But the situation is not ideal.“Even in December, we are still having issues with the internet,” said Congdon, a 31-year-old doctoral student studying seagrass. “It just happened the other day where we lost service and got kicked out of class, and we had to talk to a professor to explain that it happened again.”This is one of many solutions school officials have tried to cobble together for their students, at a time when more than half of the institute’s 50 or so faculty members and post-graduate students have been forced to pursue their education and research elsewhere.Most went to Texas A&M’s Corpus Christi campus, where officials worked diligently to make room for the unexpected influx.Larry McKinney, executive director of the school’s Harte Research Institute, said he reached out to Dickey to offer assistance after the storm.“They’re 18 miles across the bay; I can almost see it,” McKinney said. “We were in great shape, so it felt like the natural thing to do.”Harte is also a marine research institute, so it largely had the laboratory and classroom space that displaced faculty and students needed. Some students went out of state, including to Atlanta’s Emory University.Congdon is part of a team at the Port Aransas institute that has been studying seagrass since 2011, so she said it was important for them to get samples as quickly as possible following the hurricane.“It’s a horrible situation, but a lot of us are trying to use this to shed light on what sort of impacts do these disturbances have on our ecosystems, especially with the predicted changes in intensity and how frequent they are,” she said. “We’re hoping to get an idea of how resilient these species are.”It could be a year before that question is answered, however: Most of the equipment in Congdon’s lab was destroyed, and she can’t test samples until the school gets replacements.Harte scientists provided a place for Congdon’s team to test 700 water quality samples, she said.“Without (Harte), it would have been a nightmare,” she said.But Harte did not have the equipment necessary to do more specialized testing. So the samples are sitting in freezers until the foreseeable future.The sound of pouring water now greets Aubrey Converse when she walks the hallway to her lab on rainy days.The water is spilling into the women’s restroom through a hole in the roof — just another post-Harvey reality she faces as one of the few graduate students who have remained on the island.Converse, 27, stuck it out in Port Aransas because her fish are here. The fish that survived, at least.She has spent years studying the steroid receptors in fish ovaries, which could have implications in future cancer treatments. She uses two different kinds of fish because they are so genetically similar to humans.But the lengthy power outage meant her croaker fish, which can grow to be a foot long and are housed in a building near the research pier, were starved of oxygen during the storm. Half of them died, and the other half were delayed in reaching their reproductive maturity due to lack of appropriate light conditions.Converse scrambled to find replacement fish, calling every bait shop she could find. It was harder than she had anticipated.“All the boats had been demolished,” Converse said. “Thankfully I found some, and I begged the man to hold the fish for an hour until I got there.”Most of her much smaller, two-inch zebrafish survived in a closet in an administration building — a closet that now serves as Converse’s lab.She had been in the middle of an experiment with the babies when Harvey hit. Neither the babies nor her experiment survived.Converse is just now restarting her experiments, a delay of about four months. The setback also delayed her spring graduation.Converse is now hoping to graduate in August. But that’s merely a hope.“Of course (it’s) not certain yet, and (it’s) quite possible it could go into the fall,” she added.Dickey said there are three or four students whose research was so impacted by Harvey that they can’t graduate on time. The school plans to take care of them as well, covering the cost of tuition with endowment money. They also raised money to help students with housing.“We take care of our students,” he said.Dickey plans to use Harvey’s destruction on the institute as an opportunity to rebuild stronger and safer.When all the damage is assessed and the insurance money rolls in, Dickey plans to “harden” the buildings against hurricanes by installing polycarbonate windows, bitumen roofs — rated against wind, fire and hail — and resistant materials for doors.“We need to make everything more resilient,” he said.The structures need to withstand a Category 4 storm. They need to fare as well as the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium’s center on Summerland Key did during Hurricane Irma.The Elizabeth Moore International Center for Coral Reef Research and Restoration, which focuses on coral reef restoration, was right in Irma’s path when the storm bore down on the Florida Keys in September. But the center had recently undergone a $7 million renovation that, among other things, shored it up against a Category 5 hurricane.Though several outdoor tanks were severally damaged, the building held, according to a Sept. 19 summary posted on its website.“As the storm passed, our backup systems for electricity were fully functional and our coral gene-bank, and seed stock for restoring the coral reef tract, remained safe inside with running seawater systems, aeration and other critical life support,” the summary stated. “The entire building . is secure with minimal or no impact.”Still, Mote had a lot of cleanup to do. And it would be months before scientists returned to normal research operations, according to the summary.Dickey is hopeful his students can return to living on campus by February. Next, they’ll tackle the offices and laboratories.If all goes smoothly, the institute’s labs will be up and running by mid-spring.“Our students, faculty and staff have been strong throughout this whole ordeal,” Dickey said. “We’ve hit a rough road, but we’ll make it back bit by bit.”last_img read more

Build shelter homes or face consequences SC to statesBuild shelter homes or face consequences SC to states

first_imgSending a stern warning to state governments, a bench headed by Chief Justice HL Dattu said the states will have to face consequences if they fail to put shelter homes before the onset of winter.‘We will be very harsh to you if the shelter homes are not ready,’ the bench said.The bench was hearing a PIL filed by advocate E R Kumar alleging seeking its direction to governments to build shelter homes as many homeless people die due to cold in winter. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIThe bench said that it will send court commissioners to find out whether the governments have set up night shelters or not.The apex court had earlier passed a series of orders for providing shelter to homeless people saying that right to shelter is a fundamental right.‘Nothing is more important for the State than to preserve and protect the lives of the most vulnerable, weak, poor and helpless people. The homeless people are constantly exposed to the risk of life while living on the pavements and the streets and the threat to life is particularly imminent in the severe and biting cold winter, especially in the northern India,’ the apex court had said.last_img read more

Mayapur ISKCON Rath Yatra to draw one lakh devoteesMayapur ISKCON Rath Yatra to draw one lakh devotees

first_imgKolkata: Over one lakh devotees from 81 countries including India are set to participate in the annual Jagannath Rath Yatra festival and Fair at the global spiritual headquarter of International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)in Mayapur of Nadia district from July 4. As part of the colourful rituals, three carts of Lord Jagannath, Baladev and Subhadra will be taken out on July 4, from the ISKCON Rajapur temple with the journey culminating at the main ISKCON Mayapur campus covering a distance of six km. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata On the way, the three decked up carts will pass through the birth place of 16th century Vaishnava saint Chaitanya Mahaprabhu. “Considering the mammoth crowd, of more than 1 lakh, that Rath Yatra at Mayapur pulls every year we have made elaborate security arrangements and also plan to set up medical booths on the way to take care of people in case of any emergency,” said Subroto Das, Media Spokesperson of ISKCON Mayapur. The fair and festivities would conclude with the Ulto Rath or the return journey of the three carts from the Mayapur campus to the Rajapur temple on July 12. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state Around 4,000 of the devotees would be visiting Mayapur during the festival from 80 foreign countries like Brazil, Australia, USA, UK, China, Spain and Russia. The novelty this year lies in the construction of a huge pandal depicting the Jagannath temple which will become the Gundicha temple, where the Lord Jagannath will rest along with His siblings – Baladev and Subhadra for nine days till the return journey on July 12. A variety of cultural programmes would be presented by professional artists over the nine days. “It has been planned to distribute Chhappan Bhog (56 delicacies) for free to all visitors during these nine days,” said Das. The festival commemorates the annual journey of Lord Jagannath, Lord Baladev, and their sister Subhadra to their aunt’s place, the Gundicha Temple. The Rath Yatra was first celebrated by ISKCON in San Francisco in 1967. Currently, the festival is being organised in more than 1,000 centres across the world.last_img read more

Key Patient Preparations for a CT ScanKey Patient Preparations for a CT Scan

first_img September 5, 2018 — The Center for Diagnostic Imaging (CDI) in Miami recently released a list of important preparations patients should make before undergoing a computed tomography (CT) scan.Recommended steps to make the procedure a success include:1. Do not eat anything solid within three hours of the procedureSolid food consumed within three hours of a CT scan has the potential to disrupt the exam and fail to provide accurate results. Some tests require the patient to consume a contrast dye that can highlight a specific spot in their bodies, and eating food can disrupt this process. The contrast material may be given by the mouth, injection or an enema.The contrast dye can be ingested in the following ways:By Mouth — If the patient’s esophagus or stomach is being scanned, they may need to drink an unpleasant liquid that has a contrast material;By Injection — A contrast agent can be injected through a vein in the arm so that the images of the gallbladder, urinary tract, liver and blood vessels appear more clearly in the exam results; orBy Enema — In this scenario, a contrast agent would be inserted into the rectum to get a better view of the intestines. This may make patients feel bloated or uncomfortable. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 05, 2018 Key Patient Preparations for a CT Scan Patients should be advised to avoid solid foods before procedure, wear comfortable clothing News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related Content 2. Wear Comfortable ClothesOne of the best ways to prepare for a CT scan is to wear loose clothes. Tight clothing can negatively affect the scanning procedure, according to CDI. Furthermore, patients should remove any electronic gadgets before the scan, as electronic fields can disrupt the accuracy of the scan.For more information: www.cdimiami.comRelated CT ContentVIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist Workflow Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.last_img read more

New medical procedures available in Costa RicaNew medical procedures available in Costa Rica

first_imgNo related posts. Uriel Vargas has a bunch of gadgets, doohickeys and thingamabobs he wants to show you.These items have complicated medical names, too. But what’s more important is what these devices do. Vargas works for a company called Meditek, a medical treatment facilitator in Costa Rica that promotes the latest medical technology. Vargas peddles in areas like pain management, drug administration and Parkinson’s disease treatment, and the pitch is that these products are cheaper here than in the other countries, where these latest technologies are available.“A lot of the things that you can find in [the U.S. and Europe], we have it here,” Vargas said.As medical tourism flourishes in Costa Rica, the industry is looking to expand into new niches. Dental tourism dominates the market, comprising 40 percent of foreigner medical visits. Plastic surgery also remains one of the top elections. But at the country’s annual Medical Travel Summit from April 23-25, organized by the Council for International Promotion of Costa Rica Medicine (PROMED), will emphasize areas of growth like bariatric surgery and orthopedics. Those treatments might not be covered by insurance in the U.S., and cost significantly less to undergo abroad.“These are issues in which we have many advantages and it’s a place where Costa Rica can diversify itself,” said Massimo Manzi, executive director of medical tourism promoters PROMED.Manzi said he believes Costa Rica could have a medical tourism future in addiction rehab and preventative procedures.In addition, Costa Rican companies like Meditek are beginning to promote contemporary treatments that normally only exist in places like the United States, Canada or Europe. Costa Rican doctors are becoming experts in the latest medical technology, training in the U.S. and Canada, and performing operations at private hospitals in the Central Valley for crippling ailments such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes and neurological diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease. Doctors in these fields are few to begin with, Meditek said, and only one doctor offers the Parkinson’s treatment — a surgical device designed to control tremors. Only five doctors perform the pain management operations intended to reduce low body and back pain. Currently, these treatments bring in few medical tourists, and the majority of patients are expats who are veterans or retired and living in Costa Rica. Still, all treatments are FDA-approved, Vargas said. He added Meditek works with doctors back in the foreigner’s home country in regards to follow-ups.  In addition, the procedures do not guarantee 100 percent success. For example, with pain management, statistics show approximately 60-80 percent of patients report an improvement after the implant is placed in the body. However, the lower price in Costa Rica makes the procedures more cost-efficient and worth the trial.The Parkinson’s treatment costs $200,000 in the U.S., and between $60,000-80,000 in Costa Rica. The surgical insertion of an insulin pump for diabetes runs between $4,000-$8,000. Devices designed for pain management have a price tag of between $30,000-$40,000. Vargas said most procedures cost less than half here in Costa Rican than they do in the U.S., and estimates include lodging, excursions and bringing family members. Most of the procedures have a short recovery time of one or two days. Like most medical tourism operations, those who come to Costa Rica to receive one of the country’s most high-tech treatments also are expected to take advantage of the location and enjoy the beach and jungle while they recuperate.“The people that come here [for most of these treatments] can do activities right after,” Vargas said. “Get the operation done and you go enjoy some tourism.” Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Flight Centre appeal court rulingFlight Centre appeal court ruling

first_imgSource = ETB News: P.T. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) won its case in the Brisbane Federal Court against the Flight Centre Travel Group over claims of price fixing arrangements. “As we have maintained throughout this four and a half year saga, the company is not in the business of making airfares more expensive.” Flight Centre (FLT) believes the Federal Court ruling to uphold the ACCC’s competition law test case against the group “represents an inappropriate extension of the law”. Flight Centre will lodge an appeal against the ruling, citing “errors of law” in the judge’s findings. “[The] ruling is likely to have implications for the travel industry and for many retailers and agents in other sectors,” Flight Centre chief executive Graham Turner said. The Australian retail company does not expect the test case ruling to affect its operations or its business model, as the focus was on a narrow area of activity between 2005 and 2009.last_img read more

Air Tahiti Nui unveils new logo and brand identityAir Tahiti Nui unveils new logo and brand identity

first_imgAir Tahiti Nui unveils new logo and brand identityAir Tahiti Nui unveils new logo and brand identityIn celebration of its 20th anniversary, Air Tahiti Nui, the leading carrier to French Polynesia, has revealed its new logo and visual brand identity.Long synonymous with Air Tahiti Nui and The Islands of Tahiti, the ubiquitous Tiare flower takes a central position in the revamped logo, which has a sophisticated and modern new look. Carefully crafted by globally acclaimed Tahitian artist, Alex Lee, the updated Tiare flower embodies the pure, natural beauty and spirit of The Islands of Tahiti. The forward-facing flower conveys a subtle but powerful message about Air Tahiti Nui’s preparedness for the future and captures the very essence of taking flight and moving forward.The sensorial, free spirit of the Tiare flower logo is grounded by the refined strength within its new logotype. The thick and thin strokes provide a confident and established feel, and the letterforms are purposefully curved and rounded to mimic the shapes and joins of the Tiare petals, harmoniously tying together all of the elements, much like the majestic Islands of Tahiti themselves.The new logo and branding were designed by Future Brand, a brand agency specialising in brand creation and transformation. Future Brand’s past work includes the design of the new American Airlines brand as well as The Islands of Tahiti brand for the tourism board of French Polynesia.In addition to updating the airline’s visual identity and its most visible icon, the Tiare flower, Air Tahiti Nui is refreshing its positioning, values and personality around the experiential Polynesian nature of “Mana”.Air Tahiti Nui launched the new brand at a reception for clients and partners in the Air Tahiti Nui Business Lounge at Faa’a airport on Wednesday (April 25). At the event, Air Tahiti Nui CEO Michel Monvoisin unveiled the lounge’s welcome sign which features the new logo. Guests enjoyed pours from renowned French wine specialist Olivier Poussier, head sommelier of the French powerhouse Lenôtre, World’s Best Sommelier in 2000, and designer of Air Tahiti Nui’s new on-board wine selection.The rebrand is an important step in the overall transformation of Air Tahiti Nui as the premier international airline of French Polynesia. As part of its ongoing anniversary celebrations the airline will take delivery of its first Dreamliner B787-9 aircraft in October and will toast to 20 years in the sky on its official anniversary in November.For more information or to book visit www.airtahitinui.com.auAbout Air Tahiti Nui:Air Tahiti Nui operates five A340-300 aircraft from its Tahiti base to Auckland, Tokyo, Paris and Los Angeles and code shares to 37 additional destinations with carriers including American Airlines, Air France, Air New Zealand, Qantas and the SNCF rail system in France. It’s the only airline that flies from New Zealand to Europe via Tahiti and Los Angeles and one of only two carriers with direct flights from Auckland to Papeete. The airline has headquarters in Papeete and operates from Faa’a International Airport on the island of Tahiti. Air Tahiti Nui was founded in 1996 and commenced flight operations in 1998. The airline is set to take delivery of four Boeing 787-9 aircraft which will commence service in late 2018, coinciding with Air Tahiti Nui’s 20th anniversary.Source = Air Tahiti Nuilast_img read more